EverythingMedical

Apr 10

(Source: fyeahanatomy)

ajcapri:

Blood flow through the heart.
Apr 10

ajcapri:

Blood flow through the heart.

(Source: ashisbonafide)

medicalschool:

Composition of Blood
Apr 9

medicalschool:

Composition of Blood

(via ashisbonafide)

ziyadmd:

A simple technique dramatically improved the memory recall of Harvard Medical School students. Try it for yourself!

Turning a medical student into a doctor takes a whole lot of knowledge. B. Price Kerfoot, an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, was frustrated at how much knowledge his students seemed to forget over the course of their education. He suspected this was because they engaged in what he calls “binge and purge” learning: They stuffed themselves full of facts and then spewed them out at test time. Research in cognitive science shows that this is a very poor way to retain information, as Kerfoot discovered when he went looking in the academic literature for answers. But he also stumbled upon a method that really is effective, called spaced repetition. Kerfoot devised a simple digital tool to make engaging in spaced repetition almost effortless. In more than two dozen studies published over the past five years, he has demonstrated that spaced repetition works, increasing knowledge retention by up to 50 percent. And Kerfoot’s method is easily adapted by anyone who needs to learn and remember, not just those pursuing MDs.

Read More

(Source: ziyadnazem)

Mar 15
The New Way Doctors Learn

ajcapri:

General Topics of consideration: Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases.

Specification of General topic: Not yet completed but I want the research to lean to the more medical side of Environmental health. 

Emails are sent and inquires have commenced with my prospective sponsor professor.

NCUR, you are one step closer!!!!!

Any ideas, comments, suggestions? 

(Source: ashisbonafide)

Mar 14
Undergraduate Research
professorquack:

Female Anatomical FigureProbably Italian, 18th centuryScience Museum/SSPL A642635-6
Feb 28

professorquack:

Female Anatomical Figure
Probably Italian, 18th century
Science Museum/SSPL A642635-6

(via anatomydiagramnature)

ajcapri:

bill—maplewood:

There is an interesting history of skull surgery, known as trepanation, which comes from the Greek word trypanon, meaning  auger or borer. Cranial trepanation has caught the interest of surgeons  and archeologist since the 1860’s, when it was first realized that  ancient humans had scraped or cut holes in the skulls of living persons  in France and Peru.
Why would primitive cultures of France, nearly 4000 years ago, practice  trepanation? The suggested reasons for this surgery are numerous but not  substantiated. Researchers over the last century and a half have  speculated that cranial surgery was done in cases of trauma from battle  or accident, cranial infections, headaches, mental disease, and  religious rituals. Rituals involving the opening of the  skull were believed to facilitate the exit of evil spirits that caused  epilepsy. This seems plausible because in almost every age and culture  epileptic seizures were believed to be the work of evil spirits.
Examination of Peruvian skulls, by today’s physicians, reveals that  these cranial surgeries rarely became infected, and most survived.  Even more impressive are the skulls exhibiting successful  cranio-plasties (plates inserted into the trephination holes) made of  silver and gold, which were placed with such skill that the bone healed  around them. In contrast, during the 18th century, trephination of the cranium in Europe reached a nearly 100% fatality rate. (Via)
Feb 28

ajcapri:

bill—maplewood:

There is an interesting history of skull surgery, known as trepanation, which comes from the Greek word trypanon, meaning auger or borer. Cranial trepanation has caught the interest of surgeons and archeologist since the 1860’s, when it was first realized that ancient humans had scraped or cut holes in the skulls of living persons in France and Peru.

Why would primitive cultures of France, nearly 4000 years ago, practice trepanation? The suggested reasons for this surgery are numerous but not substantiated. Researchers over the last century and a half have speculated that cranial surgery was done in cases of trauma from battle or accident, cranial infections, headaches, mental disease, and religious rituals. Rituals involving the opening of the skull were believed to facilitate the exit of evil spirits that caused epilepsy. This seems plausible because in almost every age and culture epileptic seizures were believed to be the work of evil spirits.

Examination of Peruvian skulls, by today’s physicians, reveals that these cranial surgeries rarely became infected, and most survived. Even more impressive are the skulls exhibiting successful cranio-plasties (plates inserted into the trephination holes) made of silver and gold, which were placed with such skill that the bone healed around them. In contrast, during the 18th century, trephination of the cranium in Europe reached a nearly 100% fatality rate. (Via)

(via ashisbonafide)